Who Cares For Art Home Page
Student Home Page

Teacher Introduction




Welcome to "Who Cares for Art? A National Treasure by Luis Jiménez,” a thematic, inquiry-based program for secondary students. You are invited to use this program as designed or adapt it to better serve your students and circumstances.

Student Introductions

Lessons
Reviews and Interdisciplinary Matches
Follow-up Activity Tracks
Reproductions of Luis Jiménez’ Artworks
Computer Facilities
Time
Schedule
Art Students
Other Students
Younger Students
Non-English Proficient Students

Student Introductions

There are two introductions, which orient students to the program’s theme, Treasures and to its Inquiry approach.

Lessons
The program includes four lessons, which each begin with objectives:


Reviews and Interdisciplinary Matches
An automated Review at the end of each lesson helps students check their understanding. An Interdisciplinary Inquiry Match, also at the end of each lesson, helps students recognize connections between art learning and learning in other subject areas. Students can print out, sign, and date a Congratulations page to confirm that they have successfully completed each Review and Interdisciplinary Match. Or you may wish to distribute hardcopy answer sheets on which individual students can record answers.
Copy sections below to prepare your own hardcopy answer sheets:
_____________________________
Lesson One: Ideas and Images
Review


1. a b c d
2. a b c d
3. a b c d e
4. a b c d
5. a b c d
6. a b c d
7. a b c d e
_____________________________
Lesson One: Ideas and Images
Interdisciplinary Match


List the discipline:
1. _______________
2. _______________
3. _______________
4. _______________
5. _______________
6. _______________
7. _______________
_____________________________
Lesson Two: Tools and Materials
Review


1. a b c d
2. a b c d e
3. a b c
4. a b c
5. a b c
6. a b c d
_____________________________
Lesson Two: Tools and Materials
Interdisciplinary Match


List the discipline:
1. _______________
2. _______________
3. _______________
4. _______________
5. _______________
6. _______________
_____________________________
Lesson Three: Taking Care of Art
Review


1. a b c d e
2. a b c d
3. a b c d
4. a b c d
5. a b c
6. a b c d e f
7. a b c d
8. a b c d
_____________________________
Lesson Three: Taking Care of Art
Interdisciplinary Match


List the discipline:
1. _______________
2. _______________
3. _______________
4. _______________
5. _______________
6. _______________
7. _______________
_____________________________
Lesson Four: Many Viewpoints
Review


1. a b c d e f g h i
2. a b c d
3. a b c d
4. a b c d
5. a b c d
6. a b c d
7. a b c d
_____________________________
Lesson Four: Many Viewpoints
Interdisciplinary Match


List the discipline:
1. _______________
2. _______________
3. _______________
4. _______________
5. _______________
6. _______________
7. _______________
8. _______________

Follow-up Activity Tracks

There are four follow-up activity Tracks from which to choose. Each Track asks students to apply what they’ve learned in each lesson.

  • The My Viewpoint Track includes journal assignments that culminate in students writing an essay on their own responses to Luis Jimenez’ sculpture.
  • The Studio Track asks students to reflect on their own art-making experience.
  • The Treasure Box Track leads students in designing and producing their own Treasure Box. If you choose this Track, you may want to limit media choices and adapt journal/sketchbook assignments accordingly.
  • The Inquiry Track challenges students to identify an artwork they believe should be preserved for the future. Journal assignments lead to a final persuasive research report.


You may want to print out and copy Track assignments for students to use in their regular classroom, after they have had an opportunity to click on explanatory links in those assignments. Student Checklists and Final Scoring Guides are especially useful to duplicate for students.

Reproductions of Jiménez Artwork

The More about Jiménez list on the Home Page links to Websites that reproduce many two-dimensional and three-dimensional artworks by Luis Jiménez. Students can explore these links to practice basic computer navigation skills, or explore them in any time computer time remaining after they have completed their assignments.

Computer Facilities

Options for using this program depend upon you and your students' access to the Internet.

If you have regular access to an Internet-connected computer lab, you can schedule a series of class periods in the lab for students to complete the an entire class to the introductions, lessons, as well as end-of-lesson Reviews and Interdisciplinary matches online. Students should also access all the explanatory links in their assigned Track. The they can return to a regular class to complete their Track assignments.

If you have an Internet connection and a computer projection device in your classroom, you can project online information and images to your entire class, stopping to comment, answer questions, or discuss as you move through the lessons.
If you have one or a few Internet-connected computers in your classroom, you can schedule individuals and small groups to complete lessons on a rotation basis.

If you invite students to participate in the program as enrichment, or for extra credit, individuals can use any accessible Internet-connected computer, for example, in school, at home, or in a local library or community center.

Students will need additional access to Internet-connected computers and/or library resources if you assign the research-intensive Inquiry Track.

Time

Depending on their reading ability, students should be able to view all the images, read the online text, and complete the Review and Interdisciplinary Match for each lesson in 30-45 minutes. Lessons One and Three require more online reading and viewing then lessons Two and Four. The Introductions are quite brief. You can introduce them through class discussion, teach them separately, or combined them with Lesson One. The need for additional time depends on your (or your students') choice of Track.

Schedule
Plan computer access and student due dates around some or all of the following student assignments:

  • Introductions ("Treasures" and “Inquiry Learning”)
  • Lesson One: "Ideas and Images"
  • Lesson One: "Ideas and Images" Review and Interdisciplinary Inquiry Match
  • Track Assignment for Lesson One: "Ideas and Images"
  • Lesson Two: "Tools and Materials"
  • Lesson Two: "Tools and Materials" Review and Interdisciplinary Inquiry Match
  • Track Assignment for Lesson Two: "Tools and Materials"
  • Lesson Three: "Threatened Treasures" and "Taking Care of Art"
  • Lesson Three: "Taking Care of Art" Review and Interdisciplinary Inquiry Match
  • Track Assignment for Lesson Three: "Taking Care of Art"
  • Lesson Four "Many Viewpoints"
  • "Many Viewpoints" Review and Interdisciplinary Inquiry Match
  • Track Assignment for Lesson Four: "Many Viewpoints"
  • Final Project (for all tracks except Studio Track)

Art Students
All four Tracks are appropriate for art students. Choose the level of challenge you deem appropriate and the focus on studio or on inquiry that suits your curriculum. The Treasure Box and Inquiry Tracks are more challenging than the My Viewpoint and Studio Tracks.

Other Students

Teachers of social studies, language arts, history, speech, geography, gifted, honors, and other classes will find relevant information and opportunities for making connections. The program offers many literacy applications, practice in formulating questions, and experience articulating ideas through journal writing.

Younger Students

"Who Cares for Art?" is designed for middle and high school students. However teachers of younger students can adapt the program by reading the information (in a computer lab or using computer projection) to the entire class and pausing to explain and elaborate on more complex ideas.

Non-English Proficient Students

You may want to investigate online translation programs that allow non-English proficient students to copy text to read in other languages.


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